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Bio

Hannah Haines is a dancer, choreographer and educator based in Southern Maine. She graduated Summa Cum Laude with a BA in Anthropology, and Dance with a concentration in performance and choreography from Skidmore College in May 2019. While at Skidmore Hannah had the opportunity to perform works by Skidmore faculty Denise Warner Limoli, Erika Pujic, Mary Harney, Jason Ohlberg, and works by Earl Mosley, Ohad Naharin, Paul Taylor, Danny Grossman, and Isadora Duncan. Since graduation she has performed with Ballet Bloom Project under the direction of Rose Hutchens, and Natural Opposite under the direction of Holly Stone. She has presented her own choreography in film and live performances at Engine Gallery, The Frances Tang Teaching Museum, and the American Dance Festival's Movies by Movers film festival. She was selected to participate in the panel  “How to be an Ethically Engaged Anthropologist: Activism and Advocacy through Partnership and Collaboration” at the Northeast Anthropological Association Conference 2019, and to present at NYU’s 2020 Mapping Cultures conference for her theoretical research investigating using dance film as an ethnographic method. Hannah is currently an Apprentice with Lori Belilove and the Isadora Duncan Dance Company. 

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Artist Statement

I see my work as a place to play—a place to move through the silliest, lightest, bulkiest and most contorted versions of my worlds. I like to understand the quirks in human behavior, and I am energized by the pulse of small moments. This love of the little inspires my work. 


As a dancer, choreographer, and teacher I am interested in discovering how the “little” weave into tapestries of pattern. Why do some memories spiral into the atmosphere? How do some stretches of instant explode?

 

I believe that meaningful truths accumulate as molecules of moment condense into clouds of pattern. I believe that these truths can be shared through movement. By exploring patterns in the world from the vantage point of the minute, I hope to find pockets of joy, pockets of the absurd, and discover new ways to understand why we live how we live.